It’s the fourth year of open enrollment on the public health care exchanges, and your clients probably still look to you to help them navigate the new marketplace.

Find the right exchange dental plans for your individual or small business clients by evaluating the pros and cons of stand-alone dental coverage.

Pediatric dental benefits embedded in a medical plan are often subject to high deductibles (except in California).

Dental expenses in such plans usually aren’t covered until a combined medical-dental deductible (often in the thousands of dollars) is met. Check the plan’s details to determine if certain categories of dental services are waived from the deductible. In a stand-alone plan, certification requirements ensure that only a small deductible, if any, must first be satisfied.

Stand-alone dental coverage is typically worth the premium—even if enrollees only go for twice a year exams, x-rays and cleanings.

The premium for a stand-alone HMO dental plan usually costs less than two checkups at the dentist each year without insurance. PPO dental coverage costs more, but can still pay for itself with just two visits per year. With both types of dental plans, cleanings, exams and x-rays are often covered at 100% or no copay. If more expensive care is needed, the cost savings only grow from there.

Individuals enrolled in a stand-alone dental plan can clearly benefit from cost savings and improved oral health. Small businesses, meanwhile, can offer meaningful benefits that can save employees money while meeting Affordable Care Act coverage requirements.

Want more insight? Check out the Delta Dental guide to Health Care Reform for Brokers and Consultants.

See what Delta Dental offers in your marketplace by visiting healthcare.gov or your state-based exchange.

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