Broker blog from Delta Dental

Category: ACA update (Page 2 of 2)

Follow the latest news related to Health Care Exchange plans and the Affordable Care Act.

The three R’s, and why dental shouldn’t be left out

Repeal, replace or repair? These are the three R’s dominating the news in recent weeks about how U.S. Congressional Republicans want to overhaul the Affordable Care Act.

Republicans, who represent the majority in both the House and Senate, have an opportunity to rewrite the health care law, but are generally split into three camps on how to do so: Repeal the whole law now and replace later, perhaps incrementally; repeal once a complete replacement is ready; or repair the ACA for now, then determine what to do next.

Regardless of which strategy they select, something new is on the horizon, and Delta Dental is working to ensure dental benefits aren’t left out of the discussion.

About 1 million previously uninsured Americans today have affordable dental coverage as a result of dental benefits sold in public health exchanges, while employer-sponsored plans continue to enjoy tax-exempt coverage. Since our mission is to advance dental health and access to care, we want to preserve this progress in whatever legislation may come.

To this end, here’s what we’re telling lawmakers:

  • Allow people with exchange dental coverage to renew those policies with the carriers they’ve selected—whether or not those marketplaces continue—to minimize disruption.
  • If a new law includes tax credits to help eligible Americans purchase benefits, let those credits be used for dental as well as medical coverage.
  • Keep the tax-exempt status for employer-sponsored dental benefits; expand that exemption to allow individuals to pay dental premiums with tax-free dollars.

Whether repeal, replace, or repair, the key “r” word for Delta Dental is ready.

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Dental and the ACA in 2017

New reports speculating on the future of the Affordable Care Act have come out almost daily since America elected Donald Trump to be the next president. Here at Delta Dental, our leadership involved with health care reform breaks down what all the hubbub may mean for the dental benefits industry in 2017.

Clients and enrollees won’t feel effects of any major changes for a few years

No “significant change to the health care market — medical or dental” is expected for three or four years, says Jeff Album, Delta Dental’s vice president of Public and Government Affairs.

“Repeal and replace has changed to repeal and delay,” Album says. “It’s clear that both Congress and the new administration are going to want to minimize disruption to the existing system.”

Album expects Congress will take action early in 2017 to defund parts of the law, but postpone when that takes effect. In the meantime, lawmakers will determine how the replacement will look.

As the new law is developed, he says, Delta Dental will take an active role by helping the industry “define its advocacy agenda” in terms that best serve existing and prospective customers’ needs.

Health Insurance Tax could be modified or repealed in 2017

Early this year, Album says, Congress will likely seek to find common ground on the future of taxes associated with the law, including the Cadillac tax and the health insurance tax (HIT). The HIT tax, charged to insurance carriers based on premiums earned, was put on a one-year moratorium for 2017.

The fate of the HIT is the “biggest question” this year for the Actuarial and Underwriting departments at Delta Dental as they prepare for 2018, says Tom Leibowitz, vice president and chief actuary.

Overall, Leibowitz says he expects rates for dental benefits will continue to stay largely stable for 2018.

“Unlike health care, dental had fairly small impact on rating requirements from the ACA,” he says, “so those huge cost increases that have been seen on the public exchanges for medical are not taking place in the dental world.”

Public exchanges are sticking around for now, and Delta Dental will stick with them

Delta Dental and its affiliate companies have already started work on 2018 exchange plan offerings.

“We are committed to the exchanges as long as they’re a viable platform through which we can sell standalone pediatric and family dental plans,” says Andrea Fegley, vice president of Legal & Regulatory. “Participation in public health care exchanges aligns well with our mission to advance dental health and access.”

Public exchange benefit offerings complement Delta Dental’s existing business strategy, adds MohammadReza Navid, vice president of Sales.

“Regardless of the ACA’s future, Delta Dental will continue to find innovative ways to increase dental access for all,” Navid says.

Both agreed that the company’s planning and strategic initiatives will keep Delta Dental at the forefront of the industry.

What you should know about exchange dental benefits

It’s the fourth year of open enrollment on the public health care exchanges, and your clients probably still look to you to help them navigate the new marketplace.

Find the right exchange dental plans for your individual or small business clients by evaluating the pros and cons of stand-alone dental coverage.

Pediatric dental benefits embedded in a medical plan are often subject to high deductibles (except in California).

Dental expenses in such plans usually aren’t covered until a combined medical-dental deductible (often in the thousands of dollars) is met. Check the plan’s details to determine if certain categories of dental services are waived from the deductible. In a stand-alone plan, certification requirements ensure that only a small deductible, if any, must first be satisfied.

Stand-alone dental coverage is typically worth the premium—even if enrollees only go for twice a year exams, x‑rays and cleanings.

The premium for a stand-alone HMO dental plan usually costs less than two checkups at the dentist each year without insurance. PPO dental coverage costs more, but can still pay for itself with just two visits per year. With both types of dental plans, cleanings, exams and x‑rays are often covered at 100% or no copay. If more expensive care is needed, the cost savings only grow from there.

Individuals enrolled in a stand-alone dental plan can clearly benefit from cost savings and improved oral health. Small businesses, meanwhile, can offer meaningful benefits that can save employees money while meeting Affordable Care Act coverage requirements.

Want more insight? Check out the Delta Dental guide to Health Care Reform for Brokers and Consultants.

See what Delta Dental offers in your marketplace by visiting healthcare.gov or your state-based exchange.

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